Amazon Gift Card 4

 

Amazon is one of the most popular companies for scammers to impersonate when they design their phishing emails. One version of an Amazon Phishing email is broken down below.

Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

Sender Address:

Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

Instead of coming from an Amazon domain, this email comes from “Brittany Riley” from the “AndyReinhart.com” domain. This should be seen as extremely suspicious, especially if the receiver has never dealt with a person named Brittany Riley.

Subject Line:

Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

The subject line of this email is very strange as it implies that someone is sending this email to a user as a head’s up about the deal that Amazon has going on. It also states that the user could save “~50.00 off [their] next purchase” which is suspicious since Amazon does not offer coupons and does not restrict gift cards to a user’s next purchase.

Personalization:

Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

There is no personalization in this email, it is simply addressed to “Hello,” which is a big indicator that the sender of the email does not have enough information on the user to even know their name; a sign of phishing.

Branding:

Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

While the color scheme and use of the gift card image is similar to the email and images that are sent from Amazon, the lack of information and missing logo (outside of the gift card image) helps to identify this email as fraudulent.

Content:

Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

The biggest identifier that this is a phishing email is the differing content from what the subject line had stated the email would be about. The subject line states that the user could save “~50.00” while the content of the email suggests that the user may have received a $100 Amazon Gift Card.

Even within the content, there are inconsistencies with what the email is offering the user. The text of the email states that the user can “check [their] eligibility for a $100 Amazon gift card,” but the call to action button suggests that the user can just click on the link to claim their gift card.

Along with the issue of an inconsistent message, the lack of a direct link to the terms and conditions should raise further suspicions that this email may be fake.

Link:

Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

The interesting thing about this email is that the entire content is one clickable image, that leads to andyreinhart.com. Amazon would never send an email as one image and would certainly not lead them to a different website.

Signature:

Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

The signature of this email is the final indicator that this email is phishing and not an authentic email. Instead of giving the information of Amazon, this signature gives the information of “Haas Software Design.” The link that they suggest would stop emails from this sender, actually just leads to a different version of the Andy Reinhart website.

 Amazon Gift Card Phishing Email

 

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